Careers, Hobbies and Fun – Part 2

chihuahua-1378374417jQtThis post continues on from Careers, Hobbies and Fun: Brain Dump, Part 1. While I haven’t included “brain dump” in the title this time, this still is one, so don’t expect highly polished structure and an orderly linear flow!

Hears audience cries of “When do we ever? It’s not like that’s normal around here!”

Pretends not to hear and carries on.

The Ground Floor Effect

Last time around I talked about the concept of scalability, and how that leads to hyper-competitive fields in which success is nigh on impossible to come by. If your aim was to become a movie actor, a rock star, a bestselling fantasy author and suchlike, that would be about the end of the story. However when we think about blogging, podcasting, YouTubing and such, there is more to be said.

The point about say blogging is that not so long it didn’t exist. Therefore there was a time in its infancy when it was not in fact a hyper-competitive field, and all kinds of unlikely people were able to get a start and establish themselves. Of course at that time since not many people were reading blogs either, it was still not particularly viable as a career. However as the web in general grew, and blogging readerships grew, some of those people that had “gotten in on the ground floor” were able to grow with it, to the point where it could be a decent livelihood, or even in exceptional cases something of a business empire.

If you were thinking of emulating those people, now it’s (very probably) too late. The field suffers all the problems caused by scalability, plus you’d have to overcome the competition of all those little empires that have already been built!

Do I mention these things just to cause you angst at missed opportunities then? Not entirely, mercifully. Given the times we live in, there’s new stuff coming along all the time… Blogs! Podcasts! YouTube! Phone Apps! Twitch! And the type of people that read this blog are perhaps more likely than most to become aware of whatever is going to become the future next-big-thing while it’s still a teensy-little-thing. Should you have a hobby or passion that fits this description then it could well merit looking into as something that might have serious career potential.

It’s only “might have” though, because of course not every teensy-little-thing becomes a big thing. Plenty stay teensy, or indeed become pretty-much-non-existent-thing. The problem is to know which pretty-new and pretty-teensy things have a good chance of becoming big or at least biggish. You do have a couple of things going for you though. If you have geeky tendencies then you may well be an early adopter of new stuff as it comes along. Based on what got you excited in the past before most people got into it, you have a chance of telling if what you’re excited about right now is just a personal enthusiasm, or something that might catch on in a big way. Also since we’re talking about hobbies, most likely if there is anything that fits that bill, chances are you are naturally spending time exploring it for fun, without having to invest extra time or money on delving into it.

Scalability vs Niches

Despite the problems of scalability, quite a few people do manage to make at least a modest livelihood doing things such as writing books. This is possible because while a pretty small number of authors can easily meet most of the entire planet’s demand for say young adult fantasy fiction, there are a large number of specialist interests and tastes out there with smallish audiences that writers can cater to. Such writers can never hope to make it big like J K Rowling, but sometimes they can do reasonably well.

I’ve written before on the topic of whether it’s a good idea for hobby bloggers to stick to a niche, and many of the same points apply here too. Including alas the fact that “Finding a niche that is actually a good one is rather difficult”. I won’t go over the same ground again, so if this seems relevant to you, check out the older post.

In the context of turning hobbies into careers, I will add one thought though. Most of us have a number of things that we enjoy and/or know a lot about. You might have a couple of hobbies, and maybe there are aspects of your job that you enjoy as well. One place to look for potential niches is in the combinations of these different parts of your life. For instance if you like (among other things) playing video games and working with children, and your day job is in the field of mental health, you might consider things like:

  • Therapeutic uses of games for children
  • Gaming advice site for parents (e.g. reviews of children’s games from the parent angle – age appropriateness, side benefits for learning, suitability for parent and child to play together etc)

It’s not enough though to come up with something that appeals to you, you also need to determine if it’s a viable niche for you to inhabit. The types of questions you need to ask yourself are:

  • How many people would want such a thing?
  • How much would people pay? (e.g To buy a product you’ll make, to hire you to provide some service you have in mind, or to advertise on the kind of site you’re thinking of making)
  • What is the competition like?
  • Is there room for more people to do this?
  • What’s going to be different or better about what you’ll do that enough people would choose that over the other options?

If you have good answers to such questions, there is hope for your plan.

Also bear in mind the possibility of combining the “ground floor effect” with a niche. The Chihuahua podcast market may be saturated, but the time may yet be ripe to get into the Chihuahua-wearable-devices industry. Or it may not, see above.

To be continued

Looks like this is turning into a mini-series. I can only hope that a mid-season break is not needed.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s